-Home- -About- -Authors- -Awards- -Support Us- -Poetry- -Volunteer- -Guestbook- -Legal & Copyright- -Contact
AARDVARC Home Page
An Abuse, Rape and Domestic Violence Aid and Resource Collection
Find a Lawyer - LegalMatch College Expenses Piling up
Debt due to divorce, helping single mothers, questions about divorce, questions about joint assets, scholarships for abused women, scholarships for single moms

Domestic Violence: Critical Thinking, Social Policy, & Perspectives,

Domestic Violence At The Margins: Readings On Race, Class, Gender, And CultureDomestic Violence At The Margins: Readings On Race, Class, Gender, And Culture This groundbreaking anthology reorients the field of domestic violence research by bringing long-overdue attention to the structural forms of oppression in communities marginalized by race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, or social class. Reprints of the most influential recent work in the field as well as more than a dozen newly commissioned essays explore theoretical issues, current research, service provision, and activism among Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, Jewish Americans, and lesbians. The volume rejects simplistic analyses of the role of culture in domestic violence by elucidating the support systems available to battered women within different cultures, while at the same time addressing the distinct problems generated by that culture. Together, the essays pose a compelling challenge to stereotypical images of battered women that are racist, homophobic, and xenophobic.



Insult to Injury: Rethinking our Responses to Intimate AbuseInsult to Injury: Rethinking our Responses to Intimate Abuse Locking up men who beat their partners sounds like a tremendous improvement over the days when men could hit women with impunity and women fearing for their lives could expect no help from authorities. But does our system of requiring the arrest, prosecution, and incarceration of abusers lessen domestic violence or help battered women? In this already controversial book, we learn that the criminal justice system may actually be making the problem of domestic violence worse. Looking at uncomfortable facts, Linda Mills makes the case for a complete overhaul. The evidence turns up some surprising facts about the complexities of intimate abuse, facts that run against mainstream assumptions: The current system robs battered women of what power they do hold. Perhaps as many as half of women in abusive relationships stay in them for strong cultural, economic, religious, or emotional reasons. Jailing their partners often makes their situations worse. Women are at least as physically violent and emotionally aggressive as are men toward women, and women's aggression is often central to the dynamic of intimate abuse.



Initial support for this project was provided by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, under the Helping Outreach Programs Expand (H.O.P.E.) program in 2005. Points of view in this website are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Dept. of Justice. This site depends on contributions from our users. Please consider making a donation.

Extra special thanks to Daytona Luxury Earrings and our hosting company, Lunarpages Web Hosting
Last Updated: July 26, 2005