AARDVARC - An Abuse Rape and Domestic Violence Aid and Resource Collection. Colorado directory of resources for victims of crimes including domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and child abuse. Information, referrals, publications and assistance for victims.
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You the Jury: A Recovered Memory Case : Allegations of Sexual Abuse
You the Jury: A Recovered Memory Case : Allegations of Sexual Abuse


Why Does He Do That
Why Does He Do That: Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men


How to Stop a Stalker
How to Stop a Stalker


The Verbally Abusive Relationship: How to Recognize it and How to Respond
The Verbally Abusive Relationship: How to Recognize it and How to Respond


Ditch That Jerk : Dealing With Men Who Control and Hurt Women
Ditch That Jerk : Dealing With Men Who Control and Hurt Women


I Will Survive: The African-American Guide to Healing from Sexual Assault and Abuse
I Will Survive: The African-American Guide to Healing from Sexual Assault and Abuse


The Battered Wife: How Christians Confront Family Violence
The Battered Wife: How Christians Confront Family Violence


But I Love Him: Protecting Your Teen Daughter from Controlling, Abusive Dating Relationships
But I Love Him: Protecting Your Teen Daughter from Controlling, Abusive Dating Relationships


Sexual Assault: Will I Ever Feel OK Again
Sexual Assault: Will I Ever Feel Okay Again?


The Wounded Heart: Hope for Adult Victims of Childhood Sexual Abuse
The Wounded Heart: Hope for Adult Victims of Childhood Sexual Abuse


Recognizing Child Abuse: A Guide For The Concerned
Recognizing Child Abuse: A Guide For The Concerned


Transcending: Reflections of Crime Victims
Transcending: Reflections of Crime Victims


Controlling People: How to Recognize, Understand, and Deal With People Who Try to Control You
Controlling People: How to Recognize, Understand, and Deal With People Who Try to Control You


No Visible Wounds
No Visible Wounds : Identifying Non-Physical Abuse of Women by Their Men


Emotional Blackmail: When the People in Your Life Use Fear, Obligation, and Guilt to Manipulate You
Emotional Blackmail: When the People in Your Life Use Fear, Obligation, and Guilt to Manipulate You


Adult Children of Abusive Parents
Adult Children of
Abusive Parents


When Parents Have Problems: A Book for Teens and Older Children With an Abusive, Alcoholic, or Mentally Ill Parent
When Parents Have Problems: A Book for Teens and Older Children With an Abusive, Alcoholic, or Mentally Ill Parent


Victims No Longer: The Classic Guide for Men Recovering from Sexual Child Abuse
Victims No Longer: The Classic Guide for Men Recovering from Sexual Child Abuse


Thou Shalt Not Be Aware: Society's Betrayal of the Child
Thou Shalt Not Be
Aware: Society’s Betrayal
of the Child


When You Are the Partner of a Rape or Incest Survivor: A Workbook
When You Are the Partner of a Rape or Incest Survivor: A Workbook


The Emotionally Abused Woman : Overcoming Destructive Patterns and Reclaiming Yourself
The Emotionally Abused Woman : Overcoming Destructive Patterns and Reclaiming Yourself


It's My Life Now : Starting Over After an Abusive Relationship
It’s My Life Now : Starting Over After an Abusive Relationship


I Never Told Anyone : Writings by Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse
I Never Told Anyone : Writings by Women Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse


Family and Friends' Guide to Domestic Violence: How to Listen, Talk and Take Action When Someone You Care About is Being Abused
Family and Friends Guide to Domestic Violence: How to Listen, Talk and Take Action When Someone You Care About is Being Abused



Colorado Resources

Download: [Crime Victims Have Rights (PDF)]
Download: [Victimas de Delito Tienen Derechos (PDF)]

- Colorado Victim Rights
- Crimes Covered by the Victim Rights Act
- Critical Stages
- The Victim Rights Act
- Agency Responsibilities
- Insuring Your Rights
- Resources
- Restitution for Victims
- Colorado Victim Compensation Program
- Administrators by Judicial District
- Statute of Limitations

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Colorado Victim Rights

The State of Colorado's Victim Rights Act - Title 24 - Article 4.1, Part III

We are sorry to learn you have been a victim of a crime. As a victim, you may have experienced injury, loss, confusion, and a disruption of your life. Feelings of shock, disbelief, fear, vulnerability, anger and frustration may result. Having information and an understanding about the system may be helpful to you at this time.

Once a crime is reported, a person who is a victim of crime becomes part of the criminal justice system. It can be a confusing and sometimes frustrating experience. There are victim/witness advocates throughout Colorado to provide support and assistance to victims during the process. This booklet has been prepared to assist you in understanding your rights and to answer commonly asked questions. Because victims are such an important part of the criminal justice process, in November, 1992, the voters of Colorado passed a resolution to include Victim Rights as part of the State's constitution.

The law states:

Any person who is a victim of a criminal act or such person's designee, legal guardian, or surviving immediate family members if such person is deceased, shall have the right to be heard when relevant, informed and present at all critical stages of the criminal justice process. All terminology, including the term "critical stages" shall be defined by the general assembly.

(Article II, Section 16A Colorado State Constitution and C.R.S. 24-4.1-301 et. seq.)

What Crimes are Covered?

The Constitution of the State of Colorado and the laws of the state C.R.S. 24-4.1-302 (1) guarantee certain rights to the victims of the following criminal acts:

If the victim is deceased or incapacitated, these rights may be exercised by the victim's spouse, parent, child, sibling, grandparent, significant other, or other lawful representative.

Critical Stages

A victim's rights in the process are related to certain "critical stages" in the criminal justice process, these stages include:

In addition to the right to be informed and present, the victim also has a right to be heard at hearings on bond reduction, disposition of the case, such as acceptance of a negotiated plea, and a sentencing, including modification of sentence. The victim also has a right to provide input to the court regarding continuances.

Colorado Victim Rights Act

The original Victim Rights Act became effective in January, 1993 after the law was signed by Governor Romer. The Victim Rights Act was amended in 1995, 1997, and 2000. The Victim Rights Act provides victims an active role in the criminal justice process in an attempt to balance the scales of justice. The following is a summary of the rights guaranteed by the Victim Rights Act (For a complete listing of your rights, please refer to Colorado Revised Statutes 24-4.1-301 through 24-4.1-304.)

Additional rights and services are provided to child victims or witnesses. Law enforcement, prosecutors, and judges are encouraged to designate one or more individuals to try to assure the child and their family understand the legal proceedings and have support and assistance to deal with the emotional impact of the crime and the subsequent criminal proceedings.

Agency Responsibilities

Criminal Justice agencies have certain responsibilities for assuring that victims receive their rights.

Law Enforcement Responsibilities

Law Enforcement agencies have the responsibility to provide the victim written information about:

In addition, law enforcement agencies are responsible to:

Provide the victim with the business address and telephone number of the district attorney's office, file number of the case and the name, business address and telephone number of any law enforcement officer assigned to investigate the case and;

Keep the victim informed as to whether a suspect has been taken into custody and, if known, whether the suspect has been released from custody and any conditions imposed upon the suspect.

District Attorney's Responsibilities

District Attorney's should:



The Court is responsible to:

State on the record a victim objection about any motion that may substantially delay the prosecution, prior to granting any delay that the objection was considered;

Acknowledge that a victim may be present at all critical stages of a criminal proceeding unless the court determines that exclusion of the victim is necessary;

Inquire whether the victim is present and allow the victim to be heard at any court proceeding which involves a bond reduction or modification, the acceptance of a negotiated plea agreement, or the sentencing of any person accused or convicted of a crime against such victim;

Inform the victim of the results of any court-ordered HIV testing; Make all reasonable efforts to accomodate the victim upon the return of a verdict by the jury;

Determine the amount, if any, of restitution to be paid to a victim by any person convicted of a crime; and

Provide victim information to any entity responsible for victim notification after the defendent is sentenced.

Department of Corrections Responsibilities

Upon Written Request of the Victim:

Correction officials shall keep certain information such as address, telephone number, place of employment, or other personal information about the victim confidential; and

Correction officials shall notify the victim of the institution in which the person is incarcerated, projected date of the person's release from confinement; any release of a person on furlough, work release, or community correctional facility in advance of such release; any scheduled parole hearing; any escape transfer or release; the transfer to a non-secured facility; and the death of a person while in custody.

Probation's Responsibilities:

Upon Written Request of the Victim:

Providing information regarding:

Victim's Responsibilities:

Keeping appropriate criminal justice authorities informed of the name, address, and telephone number of the person who should be provided information, and any changes that occur regarding this information; and

Providing a written request if the victim wants to be notified of information regarding the post-sentence process. Forms can be obtained from the District Attorney's Office, Probation Department, Department of Corrections, the Department of Youth Corrections, or the local jail.

The Process to Insure Your Rights

What to do if you feel your rights have not been provided:

Colorado state law provides that affected persons may enforce compliance with the provisions of the Constitutional Amendment by notifying the Governor's Victims' Compensation and Assistance Coordinating Committee (Coordinating Committee).

You must first attempt to seek compliance at the local level. This may include but is not limited to:

- Contacting the person you feel has not provided you with your rights and explain specifically what has not been done;

- Seeking assistance from your victim advocates, or other supportive persons such as a counselor;

- Seeking assistance from the elected official or head of the agency you feel is not providing your rights.

Contacts may be verbal or in writing. Accurate records of your efforts to seek compliance at the local level will be helpful to you and to the Coordinating Committee should a formal request be filed. If all local efforts to obtain your rights have failed, you may request assistance from the Coordinating Committee by contacting:

Division of Criminal Justice
Office for Victims' Programs
700 Kipling Street, Suite 1000
Denver, Colorado 80215
(303) 239-4442
(303) 239-5743 FAX
1-888-282-1080 Toll-Free Number (Outside the Denver Metro area only)

Statewide Resources

Your local community has resources to provide you with support and assistance. A good place to start is with your victim advocate located at either the police department or sheriff's office, the district attorney's office, or a community service provider. Other statewide resources include:

Asian Pacific Development Center - Services for Asian populations
303-355-0710

Colorado Anti Violence Program - Services for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Population
303-852-5094

Colorado Coalition Against Domestic Violence - CCADV
303-831-9632

Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault - CCASA
303-861-7033

Colorado Organization for Victim Assistance - COVA
303-861-1160

Colorado Division of Criminal Justice
303-239-4442

Domestic Violence Initiative for Women with Disabilities
303-859-5510

Justice Information Center - Immigration Services - interpreting, translation, community resource referrals
303-832-1220

Kempe National Center for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect
303-864-5252

Native American Counseling Services
303-692-0054

Parents of Murdered Children and other survivors of homicide
303-772-6004

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Colorado Restitution for Victims
For administrative proceedings to compensate victims of crime, see article 4.1 of title 24; for restitution to victims as a condition of probation, see 18-1.3-205; for restitution as a condition of parole, see 17-2-201 (5) (c); for restitution to victims of theft, see 18-4-401; for restitution by delinquent children under the "Colorado Children's Code", see 19-2-918; for charges for bad checks received as a restitution payment ordered as a condition of a plea agreement, see 16-7-304; for charges for bad checks received as a restitution payment ordered as a condition of a deferred prosecution, see 16-7-404.

18-1.3-205. Restitution as a condition of probation.

As a condition of every sentence to probation, the court shall order that the defendant make full restitution pursuant to the provisions of part 6 of this article and article 18.5 of title 16, C.R.S. Such order shall require the defendant to make restitution within a period of time specified by the court. Such restitution shall be ordered by the court as a condition of probation.

17-2-201. Restitution as a condition of parole: State board of parole. (c) (I)

As a condition of every parole, the board shall order that the offender make restitution to the victim or victims of his or her conduct. The amount of such restitution shall be determined by the court pursuant to article 18.5 of title 16, C.R.S. The board shall fix the manner and time of payment of restitution as a condition of parole. Such order shall require the offender to make restitution within the period of time that the offender is on parole as specified by the board. In the event that the defendant does not make full restitution by the date specified by the board, the restitution may be collected as provided for in article 18.5 of title 16, C.R.S.

If a court has ordered an offender to pay restitution and you are not receiving payments as ordered, contact the Division of Probation Services.

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Crime Victim Compensation Program

Victims of crime often need financial assistance as a result of what happened to them. Financial help for costs related to medical expenses, lost employment, mental health treatment, burial expenses, the loss of medically necessary devices such as eyeglasses or hearing aids, the loss of support to dependents, and damage to home security devices such as doors, windows, and locks can be applied for through the Crime Victim Compensation Fund. Money is paid into this fund through fines against persons convicted of crimes.

Colorado's Crime Victim Compensation Program was created by state statute (CRS 24-4.1) in 1981. Colorado has a dentralized system, which means that crime victim compensation programs exist in each of the state's 22 judicial districts. The judicial district where the crime occurred is responsible for accepting and reviewing victim compensation applications. If you are the victim of a violent crime in Colorado, or if you are a Colorado resident who has been victimized in a state or country that does not have a victim compensation program, you may be eligible to receive crime victim compensation.

Victims may be eligible to receive up to $20,000 for out-of-pocket expenses not covered by insurance or other collateral. Up to $1,000 in emergency funds directly related to the crime. Funds to pay crime victim compensation claims do not come from taxpayers. These funds are collected from fines from criminals convicted of felony, misdemeanor, and some traffic offenses. Due to the number of claims and financial constraints, not every program can pay up to the statutory maximum. Again, you must contact the district where the crime occurred to determine eligibility.

Compensation Eligibility Requirements (C.R.S. 24-4.1)

For the complete Crime Victim Compensation Statute, see State of Colorado Title 24, Article 4.1

The crime must be one in which the victim sustains mental or bodily injury, dies, or suffers property damage to locks, windows or doors to residential property as a result of a compensable crime.

The victim must cooperate with law enforcement officials (district attorney, police). The police must be notified within 72 hours after the crime occurred. The injury or death of the victim cannot result from the victim's own wrongdoing or substantial provocation. The application for compensation must be submitted within one year from the date of the crime; six months for property damage claims. The Compensation Board may waiver some of these requirements for good cause or in the interest of justice.

Compensable Losses

Losses directly related to the compensable crime are eligible for reimbursement and include:

- Medical expenses
- Mental health expenses
- Lost wages
- Loss of support to dependants
- Funeral expenses
- Residential property damage, including security doors

Note: Please refer to Colorado Revised Statute (24-4.1) and the program administrator in the district where the crime occurred for a comprehensive list of compensable losses.

How to File a Claim

Victims are required to apply for Victim Compensation in the district where the crime occurred by completing an application and submitting itemized bills directly related to the crime in the district where the crime occurred. The processing time is different for each district, however, it generally takes 30-45 days to be notified of the program's decision. Contact the victim compensation administrator in the district where the crime occurred for an application and more information. If a victim's compensation claim is denied or the award reduced, the victim has a right to appeal the board's decision. The victim should be notified of the right to appeal in writing.

Download: [Victim Compensation Application (PDF)]

Victim Compensation Administrators by Judicial District First Judicial District (Golden): (303) 271-6846

Second Judicial District (Denver): (720) 913-9253

Third Judicial District (Trinidad): (719) 846-9224

Fourth Judicial District (Colorado Springs): (719) 520-6051

Fifth Judicial District (Georgetown): (303) 569-2567

Sixth Judicial District (Durango): (970) 247-8850

Seventh Judicial District (Montrose): (970) 252-4275

Eighth Judicial District (Fort Collins): (970) 498-7200

Ninth Judicial District (Glenwood Springs): (970) 945-8635

Tenth Judicial District (Pueblo): (719) 583-6030

Eleventh Judicial District (Canon City): (719) 269-0170

Twelfth Judicial District (Alamosa): (719) 589-3691

Thirteenth Judicial District (Fort Morgan): (970) 867-2877

Fourteenth Judicial District (Craig): (970) 824-7041

Fifteenth Judicial District (Lamar): (719) 336-7446

Sixteenth Judicial District (La Junta): (719) 384-8786

Seventeenth Judicial District (Brighton): (303) 655-3808

Eighteenth Judicial District (Englewood): (720) 874-8607

Nineteenth Judicial District (Greeley): (970) 356-4000 X4747

Twentieth Judicial District (Longmont): (303) 682-6801

Twenty-First Judicial District (Grand Junction): (970) 244-1632

Twenty-Second Judicial District (Cortez): (970) 565-1147

Statute of Limitations

Statute of Limitations for Prosecuting Crimes

Limitations for commencing criminal proceedings and juvenile delinquency proceedings in Colorado are generally defined in C.R.S. 16-5-401.
Except in special circumstances, under C.R.S. 16-5-401 no adult or juvenile shall be prosecuted, tried, or punished for any offense or delinquent act unless the indictment, information, complaint, or petition in delinquency is filed in a court of competent jurisdiction or a summons and complaint or penalty assessment notice is served upon the defendant or juvenile within the period of time after the commission of the offense or delinquent act as specified below:

Murder, kidnapping, treason, and any forgery regardless of the penalty provided: No limit

Attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit murder; attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit kidnapping; attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit treason; and attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit any forgery regardless of the penalty provided: No limit

Other felonies: Three years

Misdemeanors: Eighteen months

Petty offenses: Six months

In general the period within which a prosecution must be commenced shall begin to run upon discovery of the criminal or delinquent act.

Statute of Limitations for Filing a Civil Suit

Personal Injury Actions: An action for personal injury must be filed within two years of the date that the injury occurred.

Special Rules for Minors: The statute of limitations begins to run on the minor's 18th birthday.

Civil Statute of Limitations for Child Sexual Abuse: Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. 13-80-103.7 (2001): Claims can be filed within 6 years of reaching the age of majority or 6 years of the removal of a disability as defined by the statute. Subsequent court opinions have established that the Colorado SOL is a "realization" statute; namely, that the 6-year period does not begin to run until the victim comes to a realization that not only was he or she abused, but that he or she has become injured as a result of the abuse. A survivor is disabled under the statute if he or she is unable to acknowledge the abuse or the injury. Damages are limited by statute to medical and counseling costs for claims brought more than 15 years after the age of majority.






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Initial support for this project was provided by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, under the Helping Outreach Programs Expand (H.O.P.E.) program in 2005. Points of view in this website are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Dept. of Justice. This site depends on contributions from our users. Please consider making a donation.

Extra special thanks to Daytona Luxury Earrings and our hosting company, Lunarpages Web Hosting
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